KNOW YOUR BANKNOTES

You can identify a forged note if you are unable to detect the features which are present in a genuine Indian currency note. These features are easily identifiable by seeing, touching and tilting the note.

1.

Indian Currency Rs.50

Indian Currency Rs.50

2.

100

3.

Indian Currency Rs.500

Indian Currency Rs.500

4.

Indian Currency Rs.1000

Indian Currency Rs.1000

Video Links:

Know your Bank notes-

This is a feature film produced by Reserve Bank of india to eduacte indian public about indian bank note.

See also the details of bank notes

By virtual presentation, These features are easily identifiable by seeing, touching and tilting the note.

http://www.paisaboltahai.rbi.org.in/10.htm

US DOLLAR

Obverse of the Series 2006 $20 bill

Obverse of the Series 2006 $20 bill (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

How To Detect Counterfeit Money

The public has a role in maintaining the integrity of U.S. currency. You can help guard against the threat from counterfeiters by becoming more familiar with United States currency.

Look at the money you receive. Compare a suspect note with a genuine note of the same denomination and series, paying attention to the quality of printing and paper characteristics. Look for differences, not similarities.

CounterfeitGenuine

Portrait

The genuine portrait appears lifelike and stands out distinctly from the background. The counterfeit portrait is usually lifeless and flat. Details merge into the background which is often too dark or mottled.

CounterfeitGenuine

Federal Reserve and Treasury Seals

On a genuine bill, the saw-tooth points of the Federal Reserve and Treasury seals are clear, distinct, and sharp. The counterfeit seals may have uneven, blunt, or broken saw-tooth points.

CounterfeitGenuine

Border

The fine lines in the border of a genuine bill are clear and unbroken. On the counterfeit, the lines in the outer margin and scrollwork may be blurred and indistinct.

CounterfeitGenuine

Serial Numbers

Genuine serial numbers have a distinctive style and are evenly spaced. The serial numbers are printed in the same ink color as the Treasury Seal. On a counterfeit, the serial numbers may differ in color or shade of ink from the Treasury seal. The numbers may not be uniformly spaced or aligned.

CounterfeitGenuine

Paper

Genuine currency paper has tiny red and blue fibers embedded throughout. Often counterfeiters try to simulate these fibers by printing tiny red and blue lines on their paper. Close inspection reveals, however, that on the counterfeit note the lines are printed on the surface, not embedded in the paper. It is illegal to reproduce the distinctive paper used in the manufacturing of United States currency.

Starch
At many grocery and convenience stores, clerks will use an iodine-based counterfeiting pen. The pen reacts to the starch in the paper. If the bill is real, the ink turns yellow. But if the bill is counterfeit, it will turn a dark blue or black. “Most counterfeiters don’t bother to use starch-free paper. They just use paper that simulates the color, thickness and look of real currency,” Kersten said. “But if your counterfeiter is good, they will use starch-free paper.”

The Feel
The feel is probably the most common way that people detect counterfeit, Kersten said. Real currency has a “raised texture” to it because of the type of press used to produce the bills. Counterfeit bills feel flat because they are often made digitally or on an offset press. People who handle a lot of cash “can just notice that something doesn’t feel right,” Kersten said. From there, other factors can be used to determine whether a bill is counterfeit.

The Watermark
The watermark is the shadow of the portrait that appears when you hold the bill up to light. “That is one of the easiest ways for the common citizen to identify counterfeit versus genuine,” DeSantis said. Periodically, there are people who attempt to recreate the watermark, he added, but it tends to be of very poor quality. The people who do try to imitate the watermark use bleaching, Kersten said. People at stores usually only care that there is a watermark within the bill, he noted, but the watermark portrait must actually match the printed portrait to be genuine.

/AP Photo/ Lee Jin-man – A U.S. bank note claimed to be counterfeited by North Korea, left and a real U.S. dollar bill, right.

The new U.S. $100 bill is set to debut in October. Along with a sleeker, more high-tech look, the new bill has new security features designed to thwart counterfeiters. For instance, the new $100 has color-shifting ink that would be difficult for counterfeiters to duplicate. The Liberty Bell on the note will shift from copper to green when the bill is tilted.

These changes to the bill are part of an ongoing effort to help distinguish real from fake currency. “It is a constantly evolving process of putting more and more features on the bill to allow the common citizen to detect counterfeit,” said Ed Lowery, a special agent with the Secret Service.

Most of the counterfeit notes that change hands are computer-generated, which are easily distinguishable from real bills. “The process utilized to manufacture genuine notes is so detailed that there are very few systems out there that can match that level of detail in the printing,” Lowery said. People who hold both a real bill and a counterfeit bill in their hands should be able to notice a difference in texture between the two notes. From there, they can go on to look at other factors that would separate the two bills, such as the watermark or serial number.

Making a counterfeit note has never been easier since technology is so readily available for counterfeiters to print fake money at home. However, these notes are usually of low quality and should be unable to pass muster with an informed merchant. Nevertheless, “most people don’t realize that they have counterfeit [money] until they try to make a deposit at the bank or [with] a merchant,” said Joe DeSantis, an assistant special agent with the Secret Service.

Bars and nightclubs are easy places to exchange counterfeit money since they are not well lit, said Jason Kersten, an expert on counterfeiting and the author of “The Art of Making Money: The Story of a Master Counterfeiter.” In order to combat this problem, many of these establishments are looking at notes with ultraviolet lights, which can help to detect phony bills.

Stopping counterfeits can often be as easy as knowing what to look for. To find out the features one should look for when trying to detect bad notes, 24/7 Wall St. talked to DeSantis, Lowery and Kersten, in addition to using information from the U.S. Secret Service’s “Know Your Money” campaign.

The Law Enforcement section of our currency education website, www.newmoney.gov, offers contact information for U.S. Secret Service field offices around the world.

A Shanepedia Compilation

A Shanepedia Compilation

https://shanepedia.wordpress.com

shanepedia.archives@gmail.com

Along with thanks and compliments to the sources for the shared data

Reserve Bank of India, secretservicefinance.yahoo

Creative Commons Copyright © Shanepedia 2012

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